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An Emerald With A History-
The Stotesbury Emerald, a Colombian, hexagonal-cut gem weighing 34.4 carat, is a stone with a fascinating travel history. Arriving in America in 1908, it was fashioned into a necklace alongside a 94.8 diamond, the Star of the East, for Evalyn Walsh McLean. McLean was an american mining heiress and socialite who was famous for being the last private owner of the 45-carat Hope Diamond.
In 1912 the Emerald was returned to the jeweler, Pierre Cartier and was resold to Eva Stotesbury, wife of Drexel & Co's CEO, Edward T. Stotesbury. Stanton held onto the incredible emerald pendant until she sold it once again in 1946 to Jeweler Harry Winston.
Winston reset the stone into a grand ring and sold it to May Bonfils Stanton. Stanton was one of Colorado’s most dedicated and generous philanthropists who supported many causes throughout her lifetime. 
Stanton created the Clinic of Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado Medical Center, the library and auditorium of Loretto Heights College, the Bonfils Wing at the Denver Museum of Natural History, and the interior décor of the Catholic Chapel at the U.S. Air Force Academy.
When Stanton passed in 1971, the ring passed into the Parke-Bernet Galleries of New York's private collection. Three fabulous women and two legendary jewelry houses later, the ring is now set to be auctioned April 25th for anywhere from $800,000 to $1,200,000.

Do you have any gemstones you want reset? Recrafted? Come in and let us help you create the perfect piece just for you.

An Emerald With A History- The Stotesbury Emerald, a Colombian, hexagonal-cut gem weighing 34.4 carat, is a stone with a fascinating travel history. Arriving in America in 1908, it was fashioned into a necklace alongside a 94.8 diamond, the Star of the East, for Evalyn Walsh McLean. McLean was an american mining heiress and socialite who was famous for being the last private owner of the 45-carat Hope Diamond. In 1912 the Emerald was returned to the jeweler, Pierre Cartier and was resold to Eva Stotesbury, wife of Drexel & Co's CEO, Edward T. Stotesbury. Stanton held onto the incredible emerald pendant until she sold it once again in 1946 to Jeweler Harry Winston. Winston reset the stone into a grand ring and sold it to May Bonfils Stanton. Stanton was one of Colorado’s most dedicated and generous philanthropists who supported many causes throughout her lifetime. Stanton created the Clinic of Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado Medical Center, the library and auditorium of Loretto Heights College, the Bonfils Wing at the Denver Museum of Natural History, and the interior décor of the Catholic Chapel at the U.S. Air Force Academy. When Stanton passed in 1971, the ring passed into the Parke-Bernet Galleries of New York's private collection. Three fabulous women and two legendary jewelry houses later, the ring is now set to be auctioned April 25th for anywhere from $800,000 to $1,200,000. Do you have any gemstones you want reset? Recrafted? Come in and let us help you create the perfect piece just for you.

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